2020VISION

by Rebecca on March 25, 2012

in Animal Pictures

From Telegraph:

2O2OVISION http://www.2020v.org/ is the most ambitious nature photography initiative ever staged in Britain. It aims to establish in the public mind the crucial link between people’s wellbeing and a wilder UK – to show that healthy ecosystems are not optional, but are something fundamental to us all. As such 20 of Britain’s top nature and wildlife photographers have come together to document some of their country’s ecosystems.

White horse grazing on Latchmore Bottom at dawn, view from Dorridge Hill,   The New Forest National Park, Hampshire. Did you know? More than half of the   New Forest National Park is of national or international importance for   nature conservation.Picture: Guy Edwardes/2020VISION / Rex Features

Basking shark (Cetorhinus maximus) feeding on plankton in the surface waters around the island of Coll, Inner Hebrides, Scotland. Did you know? The basking shark is the second largest fish in the world after the whale shark.

Over a 20-month period, the 2020VISION team will carry out 20 iWitness   assignments at these locations, producing a set of stunning pictures, along   with supporting video footage and sound. The thousands of images and hours   of film generated from these assignments will then be woven into compelling   narratives and presented in innovative ways, such as the 2020VISION   Roadshow, a multi-city event that will reach far beyond ‘the converted’.

Basking shark (Cetorhinus maximus) feeding on plankton in the surface   waters around the island of Coll, Inner Hebrides, Scotland. Did you know?   The basking shark is the second largest fish in the world after the whale   shark.

Picture: Alex Mustard/2020VISION / Rex Features
Mountain hare (Lepus timidus) in winter coat running across snow, Cairngorms NP, Scotland. Photographer Mark Hamblin comments: 'After four hours of trudging through deep snow I was completely exhausted and slumped down to rest. Just at that moment a hare appeared over the hill running at full tilt and I was cursing my numb fingers as I tried to follow it with my camera. I got just one shot before it disappeared'. Did you know? Mountain hares survive blizzard of over 100mph in the mountains of the Scottish Highlands.

Mountain hare (Lepus timidus) in winter coat running across snow, Cairngorms NP, Scotland. Photographer Mark Hamblin comments: After four hours of trudging through deep snow I was completely exhausted and slumped down to rest. Just at that moment a hare appeared over the hill running at full tilt and I was cursing my numb fingers as I tried to follow it with my camera. I got just one shot before it disappeared. Did you know? Mountain hares survive blizzard of over 100mph in the mountains of the Scottish Highlands.Picture: Mark Hamblin/2020VISION / Rex Features
Wild boar (Sus scrofa) piglets, Forest of Dean, Gloucestershire. Photographer Andy Rouse comments: 'Getting down and dirty with this wild boar piglet meant that I had to eat the forest floor, literally. I will never look at worms the same way again. The rooting of these boar exposes the soil to fresh seed - great for forest regeneration'. Did you know? Wild boar are now established in several English counties. They were once widespread throughout the country.

Wild boar (Sus scrofa) piglets, Forest of Dean, Gloucestershire. Photographer Andy Rouse comments: Getting down and dirty with this wild boar piglet meant that I had to eat the forest floor, literally. I will never look at worms the same way again. The rooting of these boar exposes the soil to fresh seed – great for forest regeneration. Did you know? Wild boar are now established in several English counties. They were once widespread throughout the country.Picture: Andy Rouse/2020VISION / Rex Features
See more at Telegraph


Previous post:

Next post: